IN THIS ISSUE:


PRINCIPLES & PURPOSE

  • Scheduling, before and after leanMark L. Spearman of Factory Physics explains how a system that works in rich mix/low volume environments, reduces waste and stock and increases throughput can be developed.
  • The meaning of flow: Planning and scheduling should be part of any lean transformation. Kate Mackle of Thinkflow and John Darlington of Value Flow Consulting share their thoughts on why these functions are essential if a business to achieve results.
  • Standard work: how Weetabix does it: Jon Parry, performance improvement manager at cereal manufacturer Weetabix, discusses the implementation of standard work for front line team leaders.

PROCESS FOCUS: FINANCIAL SERVICES

  • Managing the regulatory onslaught using BPM: Strict regulations are an issue companies in many sectors are familiar with, banks perhaps being the most targeted. In this article, Brenton Harder of Credit Suisse explains how BPM and the development of flexible operations can help them to respond to new requirements.
  • Sustaining lean in a financial institution: Reuben Karuna-Nidhi of Deutsche Bank shares with LMJ readers the main topics being discussed at the bank as it embarks on a lean programme in its Global Technology Production organisation.

BOOK REVIEW


IT’S A LEAN WORLD: GERMANY

  • Lean, a must-do: This month LMJ looks at lean in Germany, focusing in particular on an increasingly popular improvement methodology, the Toyota Kata. Case studies in this month’s special: Kirson, Ihlemann AG and Pfeiffer.

LETTERS AND COMMENT

  • Contributions in this issue come from Richmond Hulse, managing director of XONITEK Consulting, who shares with readers an interesting discussion he witnessed at an Operational Excellence Society meeting in New York; and Roddy Martin of Competitive Capabilities International, who suggests an interesting model for management.

LEAN DIARY

  • Designing the system: In this month’s update on SCGM for the Lean Diary, Sandra Cadjenovic talks about the Pilot Phase of the company’s continuous improvement programme.

SPECIAL FEATURE

  • CI? Not good enough anymore: Most continuous improvement programmes fail, and yet we seem not to be able to stop following the old ways. Ýr Gunnarsdóttir of Nimbus and Brenton Harder of Credit Suisse discuss why CI as we know it needs to change, and how this can be accomplished.

 THE FIFTH COLUMN